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Friday, February 17, 2017

NYT: Job Hunting in the Digital Age

(Editor's Note) This article, from The New York Times by Tara Siegel Bernard, is targeting a younger audience, but the message is applicable to job seekers of all ages. It is important to understand that 21st century technology has changed job hunting strategies. If you are in a career transition and not paying attention to sites liked Linkedin or to keywords in your resume, you could be sabotaging your job search.

"Make sure you are carefully reviewing the job description and aligning your experience and transferable skills based on what the organization is looking for, said Mercy Eyadial, Associate Vice President of Career Development and Corporate Development and at Wake Forest University. If you don't, you risk not showing up in the list of potential candidates for consideration which is often based on keyword searches."

Click here for Insider Online Workshops and learn career transition skills from the experts.


Can A Job Loss Kill You?

Free online workshop: "How to Get a Job in 6 Weeks - Guaranteed" Register Here

At Closing Plant, Ordeal Included Heart Attacks 

By MICHAEL LUO

The first to have a heart attack was George Kull Jr., 56, a millwright who worked for three decades at the steel mills in Lackawanna, N.Y. Three weeks after learning that his plant was closing, he suddenly collapsed at home.


Less than two hours later, he was pronounced dead.



A few weeks after that, a co-worker, Bob Smith, 42, a forklift operator with four young children, started having chest pains. He learned at the doctor’s office that he was having a heart attack. Surgeons inserted three stents, saving his life.


Less than a month later, Don Turner, 55, a crane operator who had started at the mills as a teenager, was found by his wife, Darlene, slumped on a love seat, stricken by a fatal heart attack.


It is impossible to say exactly why these men, all in relatively good health, had heart attacks within weeks of one another. But interviews with friends and relatives of Mr. Kull and Mr. Turner, and with Mr. Smith, suggest that the trauma of losing their jobs might have played a role.


“He was really, really worried,” George Kull III said of his father. “With his age, he didn’t know where he would get another job, or if he would get another job.”


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A growing body of research suggests that layoffs can have profound health consequences. One 2006 study by a group of epidemiologists at Yale found that layoffs more than doubled the risk of heart attack and stroke among older workers. Another paper, published last year by Kate W. Strully, a sociology professor at the State University of New York at Albany, found that a person who lost a job had an 83 percent greater chance of developing a stress-related health problem, like diabetes, arthritis or psychiatric issues.

In perhaps the most sobering finding, a study published last year found that layoffs can affect life expectancy. The paper, by Till von Wachter, a Columbia University economist, and Daniel G. Sullivan, director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, examined death records and earnings data in Pennsylvania during the recession of the early 1980s and concluded that death rates among high-seniority male workers jumped by 50 percent to 100 percent in the year after a job loss, depending on the worker’s age. Even 20 years later, deaths were 10 percent to 15 percent higher. That meant a worker who lost his job at age 40 had his life expectancy cut by a year to a year and half.

Additional investigation is still needed to understand the exact connection between job loss and poor health, according to scientists. The focus is mostly on the direct and indirect effects of stress. Acute stress can cause biochemical changes that trigger heart attacks, for example. Job loss and chronic stress can also lead to lifestyle changes that damage health.

Studies have, for instance, tied job loss to increased smoking and greater chances of former smokers relapsing. Some laid-off workers might start drinking more or exercising less. Increased prevalence of depression has been tied to both job loss and the development of heart disease. 


Read the full article at the The New York Times

Related Lifestyle Article:For Ways to cope with Stress you might want to read this article 

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

WEIRD JOB WEDNESDAY-Happy Valentine's Day

SING FOR YOUR SUPPER

With Valentine's Day around the corner, this could be a timely opportunity to start your singing career by delivering SINGING TELEGRAMS

Depending on the location and costume requirements, a performer makes between $60-500 a gig. If you're a struggling actor or singer or just have an outgoing personality and a good voice, then this job could be for you! How did the singing telegram get its start?  

In the 1930's, telegrams were usually associated with death and other bad news. In 1933, a fan sent Hollywood star Rudy Vallee a birthday greeting via telegram and Western Union's PR Director had an operator sing the message to Mr. Vallee over the phone.  And that's how it all began! At that time, most singing telegrams were delivered in person since few of the lucky recipients had phones. 

Monday, January 30, 2017

Age Discrimination Act Of 1967: How Does It Affect Age Bias?


Age Bias is a real life issue that effects so many older workers. The "Age Discrimination In Employment Act Of 1967" ( ADA1967) is constantly referenced in articles and discussions. So I thought it was time for those who are interested in some light reading to have a chance to read why Congress passed "Age Discrimination In Employment Act Of 1967". Then we can begin to understand its implications on our daily lives. We look forward to your comments.(Editor's Note)
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.

Is Age Discrimination Keeping You From Getting Hired? 




EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is the text of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (Pub. L. 90-202) (ADEA), as amended, as it appears in volume 29 of the United States Code, beginning at section 621. The ADEA prohibits employment discrimination against persons 40 years of age or older. The Older Workers Benefit Protection Act (Pub. L. 101-433) amended several sections of the ADEA. In addition, section 115 of the Civil Rights Act of 1991 (P.L. 102-166) amended section 7(e) of the ADEA (29 U. S.C. 626(e)). Cross references to the ADEA as enacted appear in italics following each section heading. Editor’s notes also appear in italics.

To prohibit age discrimination in employment.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that this Act may be cited as the “Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.”


* * *
CONGRESSIONAL STATEMENT OF FINDINGS AND PURPOSE


SEC. 621. [Section 2]


(a) The Congress hereby finds and declares that-


(1) in the face of rising productivity and affluence, older workers find themselves disadvantaged in their efforts to retain employment, and especially to regain employment when displaced from jobs;


(2) the setting of arbitrary age limits regardless of potential for job performance has become a common practice, and certain otherwise desirable practices may work to the disadvantage of older persons;


(3) the incidence of unemployment, especially long-term unemployment with resultant deterioration of skill, morale, and employer acceptability is, relative to the younger ages, high among older workers; their numbers are great and growing; and their employment problems grave;


(4) the existence in industries affecting commerce, of arbitrary discrimination in employment because of age, burdens commerce and the free flow of goods in commerce.


(b) It is therefore the purpose of this chapter to promote employment of older persons based on their ability rather than age; to prohibit arbitrary age discrimination in employment; to help employers and workers find ways of meeting problems arising from the impact of age on employment.
EDUCATION AND RESEARCH PROGRAM; RECOMMENDATION TO CONGRESS


SEC. 622. [Section 3]


(a) The EEOC [originally, the Secretary of Labor] shall undertake studies and provide information to labor unions, management, and the general public concerning the needs and abilities of older workers, and their potentials for continued employment and contribution to the economy. In order to achieve the purposes of this chapter, the EEOC [originally, the Secretary of Labor] shall carry on a continuing program of education and information, under which he may, among other measures-


(1) undertake research, and promote research, with a view to reducing barriers to the employment of older persons, and the promotion of measures for utilizing their skills;


(2) publish and otherwise make available to employers, professional societies, the various media of communication, and other interested persons the findings of studies and other materials for the promotion of employment;


(3) foster through the public employment service system and through cooperative effort the development of facilities of public and private agencies for expanding the opportunities and potentials of older persons;


(4) sponsor and assist State and community informational and educational programs.


(b) Not later than six months after the effective date of this chapter, the Secretary shall recommend to the Congress any measures he may deem desirable to change the lower or upper age limits set forth in section 631 of this title [section 12].
PROHIBITION OF AGE DISCRIMINATION


SEC. 623. [Section 4]


(a) Employer practices


It shall be unlawful for an employer-


(1) to fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual’s age;


(2) to limit, segregate, or classify his employees in any way which would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his status as an employee, because of such individual’s age; or


(3) to reduce the wage rate of any employee in order to comply with this chapter.


(b) It shall be unlawful for an employment agency to fail or refuse to refer for employment, or other­wise to discriminate against, any individual because of such individual’s age, or to classify or refer for employment any individual on the basis of such individual’s age.


(c) Labor organization practices

It shall be unlawful for a labor organization-


(1) to exclude or to expel from its membership, or otherwise to discriminate against, any individual because of his age;


(2) to limit, segregate, or classify its membership, or to classify or fail or refuse to refer for employ­ment any individual, in any way which would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employ­ment opportunities, or would limit such employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his status as an employee or as an applicant for employment, because of such individual’s age;

(3) to cause or attempt to cause an employer to discriminate against an individual in violation of this section..http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/adea.cfm

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