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Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Things You Can/Can't Do About Age Bias (Part 2)

Here’s what you can do to avoid or overcome age bias:

1. Know your rights: Become familiar with the fundamental rights provided by federal and state ADEA laws. You may not always choose to pursue or enforce these rights, but you should know what is and what is not permissible. Refer to this AARP explanation of your rights under the ADEA.

2. Be clear about your objectives: Examine your personal life and work history, and inventory your knowledge, skills, capabilities, and achievements. Consider what you most enjoy doing. Identify specific employers and know the type of job you want. Get some career advice and select the occupation or profession in which you are most apt to prosper. Put all this information down in a clear and concise resume. Your clarity and confidence of purpose will come through to employers.


Click here to read part 3 of this article

9 Post a Comment :

Paul said...

Bull! Know the law, know your rights, and if an employer or potential employer is biased due to age or disability, file an EEOC complaint. It is only when people actually start standing up for their rights and doing something will the problem really begin to wane.

A company in a western Chicago suburb actually posted on Craigslist their office job would be ideal for someone in their "20s or 30s." The absolute stupidity of some of these hiring people is amazing. Those are the people who need 'rightsizing' in many cases, the very morons running so many companies' HR departments. Often uneducated, little despots who think they hold all the cards and are simply above the law and beyond reproach.

Well no, don't roll over and keep quiet about age discrimination -- speak out and get a lawyer.



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Susan said...

I agree with Paul about being aware of the law and standing up for yourself. The EEOC website states that while it isn't illegal for an employer to ask your age, it does signify the intent to discriminate. For example, a recruiter in NC, in their applicant identification section, asked not only age, but religion. I find this intolerable and difficult to believe, but true.

The article makes a good point about companies being able to lay off "expensive" employees. They can get away with it based on the bottom line, which by definition disproportionately affects older workers. In this regard, the law actually makes little sense, and you have little or no recourse.

MacBernac said...

Due to health care premiums being higher for older workers, companies will hesitate to hire older workers because they view them as a liability to their bottom line. I wish health care reform would have addressed this issue. Temp jobs, which are finally becoming more plentiful, appear to be the only option for me, and their insurance is very limited, but better than nothing. I feel that a direct-hire, full-time, permanent employment, with benefits, is out of reach for me, and there's nothing I can do about it.

MacBernac said...

Due to health care premiums being higher for older workers, companies will hesitate to hire older workers because they view them as a liability to their bottom line. I wish health care reform would have addressed this issue. Temp jobs, which are finally becoming more plentiful, appear to be the only option for me, and their insurance is very limited, but better than nothing. I feel that a direct-hire, full-time, permanent employment, with benefits, is out of reach for me, and there's nothing I can do about it.

Anonymous said...

If the silly young twits don't want to hire experience, they won't be in business for much longer anyway. I know several companies around here who "cleaned house" by laying off most of their older workers, to "save money and get fresh blood". Each one went bankrupt because they didn't have the experience and maturity to meet customer needs. When a 20 or 30 something asks me "how old are you?" I answer "old enough to know better."

Anonymous said...

I am really glad that I took the time to follow through and read all the comments. After actively searching for a job after my company closed I was beginning to feel really unnecessary but now my motto will be "it is their loss" because my experience outweighs my years.

GriedJam said...

I appreciated this topic as I have been a subtle 'victim' of this practice, having gone 'gray' (hair) early. In a second level, in-person interview I was asked - 'how many more years do you intend to work?' nice way to avoid asking my age. I answered from my gut w/ actual # I had been thining about. Next time I'll be prepared w/ a little more vague but useful answer such as: I enjoy working and plan to continue using my valuable experience for some employer for many years'

Jim said...

RE: Cost of older workers. While this is a factor, many times in looking at the actual situation you will find that it really boils down to a younger manager who feels uncomfortable with hiring someone older or more experience. Why, because either they are intimidated by the age…"I really do not want to manage my mother or father," or they are concerned for their own position…"I can't hire you because you would have my job in six months."

I have been given these exact reasons on several occasions. Recently, I was pursued by a recruiter for a corporate marketing position because of the top companies I have worked for. After the phone interview was over, I was told that while this person was very impressed with my credentials, they could not pursue the next step with me because…"quite frankly, her client, the hiring manager, should be working for me!"

Anonymous said...

I have been looking for a job for over 3 years, and I can't begin to count the number of ads that say "no more than 2 jobs post college" or "recent college graduate." Ageism is alive, well and thriving! While this article made some good points, I had a phone interview this morning where the hiring manager's voice was so young she actually squeaked! I doubt that I will be invited for an interview. It sounds like age discrimination is easy to commit but hard to prove.

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