Featured Webinar: Fastest Way To Get A Job

Featured Webinar: Fastest Way To Get A Job
Fastest Way To Get A Job Webinar


*October 24, 25, 26: "Fastest Way to Get a Job” Register Here

*October 24, 25, 26: “The 30/60/90 Day Action Plan” Register Here

*October 25: LIVE EVENT “5 Simple Tips to Beat Age Discrimination”Register Here

*October 26: LIVE EVENT “Perfect Interview Answers”Register Here

*November 1: LIVE EVENT "Stop Applying and Get Hired Instantly"Register Here

*November 2: LIVE EVENT "How to Get a Job in 6 Weeks – Guaranteed”Register Here

Saturday, December 10, 2011

10 Ways to Use LinkedIn to Get a Job (2)

5. Find out where people from a company go next. LinkedIn’s “Company Profiles” also tell you where people go after leaving the company. You can use this to track where people go after leaving your company as well as employees of other companies in your sector. (You could make the case that this feature also enables to figure out which companies to avoid, but I digress.)

6. Check if a company is still hiring. Company pages on LinkedIn include a section called “New Hires” that lists people who have recently joined the company. If you have real chutzpah, you can ask these new hires how they got their new job. At the very least you can examine their backgrounds to surmise what made them attractive to the new employer.

7. Get to the hiring manager. LinkedIn’s job search engine allows you to search for any kind of job you want. However, when you view the results, pay close attention to the ones that you’re no more than two degrees away from. This means that you know someone who knows the person that posted the job—it can’t get much better than that. (Power tip: two degrees is about the limit for getting to hiring managers. I never help friends of friends of friends.) Another way to find companies that you have ties to is by looking at the “Companies in Your Network” section on LinkedIn’s Job Search page.

8. Get to the right HR person. The best case is getting to the hiring manager via someone who knows him, but if that isn’t possible you can still use LinkedIn to find someone inside the company to walk your resume to the hiring manager or HR department. When someone receives a resume from a coworker even if she doesn’t know the coworker, she almost always pays attention to it.

9. Find out the secret job requirements. Job listings rarely spell out entirely or exactly what a hiring manager is seeking. Find a connection at the company who can get the inside scoop on what really matters for the job. You can do this by searching for the company name; the results will show you who in your network connects you to the company. If you don’t have an inside connection, look at profiles of the people who work at the company to get an idea of their backgrounds and important skills.

10. Find startups to join. Maybe this recession is God telling you it’s time to try a startup. But great startups are hard to find. Play around with LinkedIn’s advanced search engine using “startup” or “stealth” in the keyword or company field. You can also narrow by industry (for example, startups in the Web 2.0, wireless, or biotech sectors). If large companies can’t offer “job security,” open up your search to include startups.

11. Build your network before you need it. As a last tip, no matter how the economy or your career is doing, having a strong network is a good form of job security. Don’t wait until times are tough to nurture your network. The key to networking (or “schmozing”), however, is filled with counter-intuitiveness. First, it’s not who you know—it’s who knows of you. Second, Great schmoozers are not thinking “What can this person do for me?” To the contrary, they are thinking, “What can I do for this person?” For more on schmoozing, read “The Art of Schmoozing.”

Here are two more ways I can help you in your job search. First, for an aggregation of hundreds of newly posted jobs, check out Jobs.alltop. Second, to really stay on top of what’s the latest news about LinkedIn, go to Linkedin.alltop; this will turn you in a true LinkedIn power user. Just remember me when you’re rich and famous!

Was this article useful? If so, subscribe to our newsletter to read more!

You Don’t Need This Job Seekers Guide On LinkedIn. Right?

read more at:

4 Post a Comment :

Chris Kulbaba said...

This article was very well written, however to a point of clarity LinkedIn has over 100 million users. As subscriber #34,019,137 on LinkedIn, it is important to me to showcase I was one of the first third to join LinkedIn. Knowing your User ID is important if you joined early enough, of course....

Great tips, useful information here, and of course I agree with it all and suggest these tips to clients on a regular basis - and they work.

Chris "The Social Media Guy" Kulbaba

Anonymous said...

Great article. I'm forwarding to friends who can use the advice. But how do you find out your Linkedin subscriber number? I joined several years ago and would be curious to know mine.

Anonymous said...

Great article. Thanks for sharing!

How To Use Linkedin said...

I like your article this is really shareable, but i thing i want to ask is really LinkedIn have 100 million users?

Post a Comment

Was this article useful? If so, subscribe to our newsletter to read more!

Google Analytics Alternative