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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Older Skilled Worker: Simple 5 Tips When Sending & Creating A Resume



So you think you are a savy techno expert? But sometimes the smallest detail can make difference as to whether a recruiter gets to even see your qualified resume. For example have you ever thought that about how the file name of your resume could affect whether you make it to the "A" resume pile. Well you might want to think again. See a few simple tips that are worth their weight in gold.(Editor's Note)




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18 Post a Comment:

Anonymous said...

Good ideas in a short video. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Good tips but one question: How can you suggest to a recruiter to accept PDF resumes? The vast majority of ads still ask for .doc files.

Anonymous said...

It's best not to ask them to accept PDF resumes but to meet whatever technology requirements they have. Not every organization has the software to handle PDF files. Also, I'm wondering if this restriction is related to how scanning software works that would make PDF files and their usual accompanying graphics unusable.

Anonymous said...

I'm wondering why anyone would WANT to send a PDF resume. I hate it when anyone sends me a PDF file. I would never do that to anyone else!

Anonymous said...

A PDF file for the most part is not editable without the full Adobe Acrobat package or some third party package. The PDF file was designed for that purpose. The PDF file is generally larger than it's MS Word counterpart. You can also generate a HTML document in an attempt to keep someone from editing your resume. The issue here seems to be to show some essence of technical astuteness. The real way to “show” an elevated level of technical ability would be to do a PowerPoint presentation with timed screens. Have someone who does not know your background to review the PowerPoint to determine whether it can be read within the screen timing. You can add pictures of your work as well. The drawback to all this is scanning a resume into a database for which an unformatted RTF file is the best.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

I attempted to add JPG photographs of PLC panels and switchgear; but the resume bases and the recruiters systems would not accept the resume; posting an error of non-permitted content. When I removed the JPG pictures the systems accepted my resume. The idea of a PowerPoint resume is good except if you do timed screens; how long do you make the time frames. HR managers will get agitated if they are too fast or too slow; you can never please them. Many HR managers will not know how to index the screens if you leave the index as manual; they will never find the arrows hidden at the bottom left of the screen unless they happen to run their cursor across them and experiment a little. The issue is still non-permitted content.

mlboucher said...

What does any of this have to do with older applicants, as stated in the article title???

Anonymous said...

I would make sure that my Resume/CV was written using proper spelling and grammar, unlike the Editor's Note:

Editors Note (should be Editor's Note): So you think you are a savy techno expert (is this a question? It needs a ?). But sometimes the smallest detail can make difference (can make a difference, surely?) as to whether a recruiter gets to even (even gets to) see your qualified resume. For example (would probably use - for example,) have you ever thought that about how the file name (? thought about how the file name...) of your resume could affect whether you make it to the "A" resume pile. Well you might want to think again. See a few simple tips that are worth there (their) weight in gold.

Anonymous said...

Interesting points, however, I have a good tip for formatting resumes to paste them electronically. Copy and paste your resume into notepad or wordpad, then edit it for any formatting issues and save it as a txt file. Then use that file to upload to the company site. Of course, if they do accept a pdf, use that method first.

Sheilas_16 said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
oceanflash08 said...

Sheilas_ 15.thanks corrected.

Anonymous said...

This whole blog seems somewhat suspicious to me. I get links to it from Linkedin. The organization of this site is just so ragged; it's on par with a government agency if not below.
Also, as it's tough enough for people over 40, why would anyone want to display an affiliation to this group in any social or public way? I mean, your age will be obvious if you get to the interview, but broadcasting it is just another way to help some HR department screen you out.

D.K. SHAW said...

TO QUOTE, 'Sheilas_16' :
"There is no relevance to this article for unemployed mature workers no matter what the age factor.",

and, 'mlboucher':
" What does any of this have to do with older applicants, as stated in the article title???

ALSO, Why is there a,
'Sheilas_15',& a, 'Sheilas_16'?

This whole link & video are very misleading & appear as though done by a rookie who does not know proper grammer, nor spelling !!

Subscibe to the 'newsletter',
....not a chance !
D.K. SHAW;
Penticton, B.C. Canada

Alex said...

I wrote an article that would complement this nicely, it is the 12 tips for your IT resume. Check it out on our blog.
http://technologycerts.posterous.com/

fight wrinkles said...

He that talks much errs much

Jas said...

To those who asked why anyone would want to send a PDF resume, I have a very simple reason. With PDF, the formatting doesn't change from one version, printer, or computer to the next. Sometimes, a Word document that looks and prints fine on your system, looks and prints completely differently when someone else opens it using a different version, or prints it using a different printer.

Debby said...

Very helpful. That was one thing I had not thought of.

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